Redondo Beach proposed skatepark

A computer generated layout of the proposed skatepark at Redondo Beach Pier shows the basic elements of the design, which still might be subject to change. (Courtesy Spohn Ranch Skateparks)

After years of discussions, Redondo Beach will finally get not one, but two skateparks — though somewhat impish ones.

The City Council on Tuesday directed staff to move forward with design and construction of two skatepark facilities one on an octagon shaped portion of concrete near the International Boardwalk on the Pier and another at Perry Park in the northern part of the city.

The skatepark on the pier will include various features such as two quarter-pipes, rails, ledges and a table top that can be used as a stage at a cost of $110,000. At Perry Park, a small quarter-pipe and two concrete grind ledges will sit near a basketball court. The cost of that site was $30,000.

When including planning costs, the two projects will cost roughly $175,000. The Kings Foundation will contribute $25,000 and the Redondo Beach Police Foundation was expected to contribute another $25,000 toward the two projects. 

Mayor Bill Brand said it was far overdue for the city to have a skatepark, crediting the volunteer efforts of resident David Bernier, who helped solicit the Spohn Ranch Skateparks to design and evaluate various other locations.

Other sites considered included Czuleger Park, Anderson Park, Franklin Park and Lilienthal Park. The most substantial proposed skatepark, complete with two pools and several transition elements, was estimated to cost $750,000.

“It’s exciting we finally found something that can work,” Brand said. “Redondo deserves to have a skatepark.”

The city is also expected to get an 8,000 square-foot skatepark as part of the South Bay Galleria redevelopment, based on an agreement made by the developer during negotiations with the City Council in January 2019.

The site near the International Boardwalk won out over other potential sites because it was far enough away from residential homes to cause noise disturbance and because the site is centrally located.

“What’s really appealing is the vibrant atmosphere for skaters and non skaters,” said Vince Onel with Spohn Ranch. “That’s what we like most about this site is the vibrant atmosphere. It’s right on the water and right on the pier so there is all this activity.”

While the Fire Department had not objection to the pier site, its operations chief expressed concerns with the location saying it was difficult to access should someone get hurt.

Rashel Mereness, co-owner of The Slip Bar and Eatery, said that while she supported a skatepark, she opposed the placement near her business and several others.

“I feel like placing the skatepark there without making certain accommodations will decrease the number of residents who can use the area,” Mereness said. “There are 15 tables there used by the businesses at the board walk. They are full and a lot of families use them. I don’t know how many people can use a skatepark at any moment but it’s less than that.”

The project developers said they would find a suitable place for each of the tables that will be displaced by the skatepark. The design also includes multiuse abilities to accommodate fitness classes or concerts, similar to the way the space is used now.

Designers also said they would install speed arresting devices in the pathways leading to the skatepark to avoid excessive speeds from heading toward the park in the heavily pedestrian trafficked area.

Contact Lisa Jacobs lisa.jacobs@TBRnews.com or follow her on Twitter @lisaannjacobs.

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